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Theme : Advanced Innovations in the field of Plant Science & Agriculture

About Conference

We feel fortunate to announce World Congress on Plant Science and Agriculture (WCPA) witnessing at London, UK during March 25-26, 2020 
Theme:Advanced Innovations in the field of Plant Science & Agriculture” 
WCPA 2020 is inventory to introduce and sum up the current research activities and to project the strengthening in the field of Plant Science and Agriculture. It serves as a forum for scientists, researchers and students to share and learn from colleagues through Plenary, keynote, oral and poster presentations, Symposia, Workshops and Exhibitions with Career development programs. Our main aim is to become a bond in between the scientists and the world for improving the new research and innovative ideas. 
Scope of WCPA 2020 It serves as a resource to international research communities through important and timely discussions on areas related to plant science, plant anatomy, plant genetics, plant and agriculture environment, plant nutrition and agro forming, agriculture engineering, agro forestry. 
Business Networking is an avenue for vendors to have network and B2B meetings with “Top Scientists and Colleagues” with an effective low Cost Marketing Method for developing sales and opportunities and contacts, Based on referrals and introductions either Face-to-Face at meetings and gatherings, or By other contact methods such as telephone, E Mail, Digital and Increasingly Social And Business Networking Websites. 

Why to Attend? 

Plant Science 2020 is to gathering people in academia and society interested in Botany & Agrifarming to share the latest trends and important issues relevant to our field/subject area. The Scientific program of the conference is broad and embraces different research aspects with focus on applied Sciences and in particular research interest. The conference will include invited speakers, oral presentations, poster session and young scientist award. The aim of the conference is to provide a platform to academicians and practitioners from multiple disciplines to debate and deliberate on social change that is encompassed by innovation and technology. 

Target Audience

Plant Science / Agricultural Students Scientists 
Plant Science Faculty 
Agricultural Universities 
Plant and Agriculture Associations and Societies 
Business Entrepreneurs 
Soil science and soil-plant nutrition 
Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Sciences 
Manufacturing Agricultural Devices Companies 
R&D Laboratories 
Food Science and Safety Department 
Forestry and Landscaping Scientists 
Young Researchers 
Training Institutes & Industry Professionals 

Scientific Sessions 

 Track 1: Plant Science and Plant Research 
       Plant Science is originated in prehistory as herbalism with the efforts of early humans to identify and later cultivate edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Medieval physic gardens, often attached to monasteries, contained plants of medical importance. They were forerunners of the first botanical gardens attached to universities, founded from the 1540s onwards. One of the earliest was the Padua botanical garden. These gardens facilitated the academic study of plants. Efforts to catalogue and describe their collections were the beginnings of plant taxonomy, and led in 1753 to the binomial system of Carl Linnaeus that remains in use to this day. 
Plant domestication 
Natural variation in plants 
Plant immunity 
Plant symbiosis 
Relevant Societies: 
UK Plant Sciences Federation (UPSF) 
Botanical Society of China (BSC) 
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) 
Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS) 
Track 2: Agricultural Biotechnology 
         Agricultural Biotechnology is the combination of scientific tools and techniques including genetic engineering, molecular markers, molecular diagnostics, vaccines, and tissue culture to modify agricultural productivity, quality, diversity and species protection. Agricultural Biotechnology is developed to cope up with current challenges which are usually cannot be solved by traditional practices. Agricultural Biotechnology also helps in climate adaptation, stress management, and disease management. Biotechnology has introduced modern technologies to deal with the global food crisis. Agriculture conference provides an opportunity to researchers and scientist to explore the advanced and latest research developments in the field of Agricultural Biotechnology. 
Phytoremediation 
Nutrient Supplementation 
Antibiotics 
Relevant Societies: 
Committee of Professional Agricultural Organizations (COPA) 
General Committee for Agricultural Cooperation in the European Union (COGECA) 
Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV) 
American Society of Agronomy (ASA) 
Track 3: Sensing and Signaling in Plant Stress Response 
         Plant stress is the quantification of environmental effects on plant health. When plants are subjected to less than ideal growing conditions, they are considered to be under stress. Stress factors can affect growth, survival and crop yields. Plant stress research looks at the response of plants to limitations and excesses of the main a biotic factors, and of other stress factors that are important in particular situations. 
Sugar-Sensing 
Flooding 
Wounding 
Relevant Societies: 
African Crop Science Society (ACSS) 
Canadian Society of Plant Biologists (CSPB) 
Chile’s National Network of Plant Biologists (CNNPB) 
Chinese Society of Plant Biology (CSPB) 
Track 4: Plant Genetics & Genomics 
        Plant genetics deals with heredity in plants, specifically mechanisms of hereditary transmission and variation of inherited characteristics. Plant genetics differs from animal genetics in a number of ways: somatic mutations can contribute to the germ line more easily as flowers develop at the end of branches composed of somatic cells, polyploidy and plants additionally contain chloroplast DNA
Genome duplication 
Polyploidy in plants 
Relevant Societies: 
Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) 
European Association for Research on Plant Breeding (EUCARPIA) 
Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) 
Track 5: Plant Anatomy and Morphology 
     Plant anatomy refers to the detailed structure of the plant leaf, stem, roots, flowers, and fruits, while plant physiology is concerned with the processes that occur within the plant that account for it being alive and productive. A living plant must collect a few simple materials from the environment water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and several minerals. 
     Plant morphology is the study of plant anatomy, is a reflection of ecological adaptation. Due to the strong relationship between form and function, plant morphology has strong implications for plant physiology. Plant phenology, or timing of developmental events in plants, is also a reflection of ecological and genetic characteristics. 
Plant evolution 
Non-vascular plants 
Relevant Societies: 
Genetics Society of China (GSC) 
International Society of Plant Pathology (ISPP) 
Indian Society of Plant Physiology (ISPP) 
International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS) 
Track 6: Plant Nutrition & Soil Science 
         Plant nutrition is the study of chemical compounds that are utilized for growth of plant. A plant nutrition and soil science mainly focuses on the Nutrient management, Mineral fertilization, chloroplasts, biogenesis, Soil microbial genomics, evolutional biology, Genetic analysis, abiotic stresses. Plant nutrition deals with the development of reusing assets, supplements-related to the configured ecological effects. 
        Soil science is the investigation of soil as a characteristic asset on the surface of the Earth including soil development, order and mapping and soil disintegration
Nutrient balance 
Nutrient deficiencies 
Soil Microbiology and Soil Remediation 
Soil chemistry 
Soil fertility 
Relevant Societies: 
Irish Plant Scientists' Association (IPSA) 
International Society for Plant Molecular Biology (ISPMB) 
Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists (JSPP) 
Track 7: Plant Diseases and Bryology 
         Plant Diseases are typical condition in plant root changes its fundamental capacities. All types of plants, wild and developed alike are liable to disease. Although each species is vulnerable to trademark diseases, these are, for each situation, moderately few in numbers. The event and predominance of plant diseases fluctuate from season to season, contingent upon the nearness of the pathogen, natural conditions, and the products and assortments developed. Some plant varieties are especially subject to episodes of infections while others are more impervious to them. Despite the fact that plants have changed a considerable measure in the previous 450 million years, developing today in a huge assortment of shapes and sizes, they would all be able to be arranged into two requests, called tracheophytes and bryophytes. Tracheophytes are plants, similar to trees, blooming plants, and grasses that have a very much created vascular framework. Conversely, bryophytes are little plants that develop near one another and don't have a vascular framework, which makes them fundamentally the same as those first plants that developed on Earth a great many years back. The investigation of these old plants is called bryologist
Plant Microbial Interactions 
Plant Diseases Epidemiology 
Plant Bacteriology 
Plant Fungal Pathology 
Relevant Societies: 
The Global Plant Council (GPC) 
European Rural History Organization (EURHO) 
European Environment Agency (EEA) 
European Plant Science Organization (EPSO) 
Track 8: Plant Ecology and Diversity 
         Plants occur over Earth's surface in very much characterized examples that are firmly corresponded with both atmosphere and the historical backdrop of the plant. Timberlands are the most imperative of these common networks from the angle of territory, carbon content, yearly carbon obsession, the cycling of supplement components, and impact on vitality and water spending plants, and in addition being the vital repository of biodiversity ashore. The broadest woodlands are the boreal coniferous backwoods of North America, Scandinavia, northern Europe, and northern Asia. The clammy timberlands of the tropics are the most differing, frequently containing upwards of 100 types of trees for every hectare (1 hectare = 2.47 sections of land) and at times some more. Biodiversity is the aggregate fluctuation inside and among types of every single living life form and their natural surroundings. 
Genetic diversity 
Biodiversity 
Relevant Societies: 
Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) 
The National Vegetable Society (NVS) 
African Seed Trade Association (ASTA) 
Track 9: Plant Nanotechnology & Food Nanotechnology 
          Plant nanotechnology involves complex processes in signal transduction mechanisms and in the plant regulation of DNA expression. Towards, it shows main role in antioxidant process for agriculture and botanical sciences and their main aim at analysis of plant metabolism. The increasing part of application of nanoparticles represented in smart delivery systems, promoting noble prize supports for components of magic bullets. Nanotechnology is very important role in agriculture, pesticides which will acts as a chemical delivery agent that targets the cellular organelles in plants. 
          Food nanotechnology is concerned with the application of nanotechnology in food packaging to extend the life or safety of food, to detect harmful bacteria, or to produce stronger flavors. Nanotechnology has begun to find potential uses around functional food by engineering biological molecules toward functions various from those they have in nature, opening a whole new area of development. When nanotechnology or its application or Nanomachine is used during production, cultivation, and packaging of food it is called as Nano food. It does not mean that atomically modified food is made by Nanomachines
Nanotechnology applications in plant pathology 
Relevant Societies: 
National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NCGEB) 
Track 10: Agriculture Engineering 
          Agricultural Engineering is leading to create a new revolution in sustainable agriculture which is totally Eco-friendly. By the middle of the 20th era, Agricultural Engineering derives into four types of activity like Power and machinery, Irrigation and drainage, Farm constructions and environment, Processing and electrification. Most Agricultural Engineering is aware of organic engineering, well-organized use of irrigation water, renewable energy, and environmental issues. It is fronting three great encounters, Food safety and Food security, protecting the species and natural resources and decreased employment status. 
Agricultural resource management 
Polymer in agriculture 
Bio-information system 
Relevant Societies: 
UK Plant Sciences Federation (UPSF) 
Botanical Society of China (BSC) 
Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS) 
Track 11: Agro forestry & Landscaping 
          Trees and shrubs are grown around or among crops, or shrubs and trees in agricultural and forestry for more profitable and healthy. Over conventional agriculture and forest production agro forestry is an advantageous method. It provides a more diverse habitat. For agro forestry, the soil is protected from soil erosion by ground cover. Agro forestry conserves species diversity and secure natural resources, decrease pollution, control soil disintegration, and improve wildlife biodiversity. The advantages of agro forestry contain upgrade of the development of agro-economy and reserve sustainability. Agroforestry influence agro biological system and expansion of crop species. The best research requires is to create cultivate level investigations to economic costs, benefits which may diminish dangers related to agro forestry and support the cost of items. Landscaping also called gardening to include living elements like flora and fauna. 
Biomass utilization 
Grassland and natural resource management 
Applications of agro forestry: alley cropping, strip cropping, etc
Relevant Societies: 
Korean Society of Plant Biologists (KSPB) 
Committee of Professional Agricultural Organizations (COPA) 
European Commission on Agriculture (ECA) 
Argentinean Society of Plant Physiology (SAFV) 
Track 12: Greenhouse & Horticulture 
          A Greenhouse is a shape with walls and roof made largely of transparent material, such as glass, in which plants requiring managed climatic conditions are grown. These structures range in size from small sheds to industrial-sized buildings. A miniature greenhouse is known as a cold frame. The interior part of a greenhouse exposed towards the sunlight becomes extremely warmer than external temperature. The primary crops grown in greenhouses include pepper, tomato, cucumber, lettuce, herbs, and strawberry. 
          Horticulture manages the workmanship, science, innovation, and business of plant development. It incorporates the development of therapeutic plant, natural products, vegetables, nuts, seeds, herbs, grows, mushrooms, green growth, blooms, kelp and non-sustenance yields, for example, grass and elaborate trees and plants natural development. It likewise incorporates plant protection, scene rebuilding, scene and garden structure, development, and upkeep, and arboriculture
Fruit and vegetable breeding 
Arboriculture 
Turf management 
Horticultural produce marketing and value chains 
Relevant Societies: 
European Association for Research on Plant Breeding (EUCARPIA) 
European Plant Science Organization (EPSO) 
Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) 
Track 13: Agriculture & Food Security 
           Agriculture congress focus on mainly for food security and prosperity incorporate state-wise, past, present and future system issues, and harvest insightful maintainability of agriculture. Quantity, quality, and safety, also required for food security. The most common causes that affect food security like drought, pests and livestock disease, cash crop dependence and lack of emergency plans. Globalization, particularly, effectively influences the food production network by endorsing scale effect in the nourishment business. Agricultural conferences allow scientists and specialists to explore advanced and latest researches progression for food security. 
Sustainable intensification of food production systems 
Innovative ways of feeding increasing population 
Post-Harvest Handling and Processing
Relevant Societies: 
Genetics Society of China (GSC) 
International Society of Plant Pathology (ISPP) 
Indian Society of Plant Physiology (ISPP) 
International Crop Science Society (ICSS) 
Track 14: Fertilizers & Pesticides 
           A fertilizer is any material of natural or synthetic origin that is applied to soils or to plants tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants. Fertilizers enhance the growth of plants. This goal is met in two ways, the traditional one being additives that provide nutrients. The second mode by which some fertilizers act is to enhance the effectiveness of the soil by modifying its water retention and aeration. 
           Pesticides are substances meant for attracting, reducing, and destroying, or mitigating any pest. They are a class of biocide. The most common use of pesticides is plant protection products (also known as crop protection products), which in general protect plants from damaging influences such as weeds, plant diseases or insects. This use of pesticides is so common that the term pesticide is often treated as synonymous with plant protection product, although it is, in fact, a broader term, as pesticides are also used for non-agricultural purposes. 
Herbicides 
Bio-fertilizers 
Single nutrient fertilizers 
Multi nutrient fertilizers 
Insecticides 
Relevant Societies: 
Irish Plant Scientists' Association (IPSA) 
Japanese Society for Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (JSPCMB) 
Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists (JSPP) 
New Zealand Society of Plant Biologists (NZSPB) 
Track 15: Plant Science: Antibodies, Antigens and Antibiotics 
           Antibodies are useful for the detection, measurement and purification of intracellular and extracellular constituents of plants and pathogens. Their high sensitivity coupled with a potential for high specificity, can be used to indicate the presence and amount of a given antigen in whole cells, tissues, and in crude and purified extracts of plant material. Antibodies are useful in plant biochemistry, cell and molecular biology to localize key cellular constituents (enzymes, structural proteins, etc.), to quantify developmental or other changes and to identify specific gene products. Their usage in plant pathology is also growing where antigen detection provides a powerful and specific tool for identification of disease at an early stage. 
Bacterial systems 
Purification of Antibodies 
Relevant Societies: 
The Global Plant Council (GPC) 
European Rural History Organization (EURHO) 
European Environment Agency (EEA) 
European Plant Science Organization (EPSO)
Track 16: Agriculture Environment 
            Agriculture environmental impact of agriculture varies based on the wide variety of agricultural practices employed around the world. Ultimately, the environmental impact depends on the production practices of the system used by farmers. The connection between radiation into the environment and the farming structure is incorrect, as it also depends on other climate fribbles such as rainfall and temperature
            The environmental impact of agriculture involves a variety of factors from the soil to water, the air, animal and soil diversity, people, plants, and food itself. Some of the environmental issues that are related to agricultural climate change, deforestation, genetic engineering, irrigation problems, pollutants, soil degradation, and waste. 
Forecasting in agriculture 
Climate change impacts on agriculture 
Mitigation and adaptation 
Impacts on nutrition, quality and resource use efficiency 
Structures and Environment Modification Systems 
Relevant Societies: 
The National Vegetable Society (NVS) 
Asia-Pacific Association of Agricultural Research Institutions (APAARI) 
African Seed Trade Association (ASTA) 
Track 17: Organic Farming- Production & Marketing 
           Organic farming is a method of crop and livestock production that involves much more than choosing not to use pesticides, fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, antibiotics and growth hormones
           Organic production is a holistic system designed to optimize the productivity and fitness of diverse communities within the agro-ecosystem, including soil organisms, plants, livestock and people. The principal goal of organic production is to develop enterprises that are sustainable and harmonious with the environment. 
           Organic Marketing business aspects of transitioning to organic and resources for organic farming business plans, crop share agreements, renting land and building sustainable farms. 
Livestock 
Weed Management 
Organic Culture

Relevant Societies: 

UK Plant Sciences Federation (UPSF) 
Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) 
International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) 
American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) 
Australian Society of Plant Scientists (ASPS) 
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MARKET RESEARCH


While market research is valuable and usually vital in all sectors, it is especially important in agriculture. This is because the traditional agricultural business model involved farmers marketing products to known buyers. In fact, in many cases, fundamental farming and growing decisions (i.e. what to grow, how much to grow, when to harvest, how to store and ship, etc.) were made on a contractual basis. It was a classic risk-reward trade-off, with most farmers opting to accept a relatively smaller profit margin in return for a confirmed purchase. 
However, these days farming is far more sophisticated, complex and multifaceted than in years past. There are numerous value-added products and services, along with increasing global competition, changing customer dynamics, and new buyer personas. Forget about the stereotype of farmers meeting in the middle of town to “do some trading.” Today’s agricultural marketplace professionals are more likely to have an MBA than a pickup truck. 
Ultimately, this means businesses that want to sell in the massive $400+ billion dollar agricultural sector, as well as those currently in the sector who want to generate maximum profit while reducing their risk exposure, cannot rely solely on historical data to make decisions. They need to look forward and anticipate what is coming down the pipeline next month, next year and next decade, and that is where agricultural market research enters the picture.  
Advantages: 
Opportunity Analysis 
The history of business is overflowing with great ideas that should have been enthusiastically adopted, but failed to get off the ground because of limited market demand. And of course, there are other ideas for which demand existed, but production and distribution costs resulted in a price position that the market deemed too high. 
Agricultural market research takes a pragmatic, down-to-earth look at the viability of introducing a new product or service in the market, and verifies whether it will be profitable and sustainable (and if not, what may need to change to make it both of these things). 
Selling an Idea 
While having a viable idea is obviously critical, it is not the full story – because that idea has to be sold to customers in an effective way. For example, if a new solution is a software system that helps farming operations track, monitor, analyze and compare their roster of logistics vendors, then the presentation or pitch to sell it will typically involve a demo, and perhaps a free trial that proves value. The price position must also be strategically chosen to ensure that ROI is achievable within a realistic time frame (i.e. if a customer must purchase software licenses for 3 years before profit is realized, what happens if they leave after 2 years or even 1?). Agricultural market research helps uncover all of these details, and ensure that innovative products and service will profitably sell in a competitive marketplace. 
Analyzing the Competition 
Agricultural research is also necessary to shed light on what the competition is doing, and especially, what investments they are making in everything from product development to marketing and advertising. A high-level scan cannot reveal many of the critical details and nuances that make a profound difference between smart and informed decision-making, and heading down the wrong road.

WHY TO ATTEND?


This event will provide an opportunity to build and expand your network with various people and gives chance to make collaboration with other universities and research labs. It also helps you to meet the experts in the relevant field of study. It gives the access to novel instruments in the market. This conference plays a major role in your business development and maximizes the profit. The aim of the conference is to provide a platform to academicians and industrial experts from multiple disciplines to debate and deliberate on social change that is encompassed by innovation and technology.

WHY CHOOSE US

WHY CHOOSE US

  • Scietech International is initiated to meet a need or to pursue collective goals of the scientific community, especially in exchanging the ideas which facilitate growth of research and development.
  • We specialize in organizing conferences, meetings and workshops internationally to overcome the problem of good and direct communication between scientists, researchers working in same fields or in interdisciplinary research.
  • Scietech International promotes open discussions and free exchange of ideas at the research frontiers mainly focusing on science field.
  • Intense discussions and examination based on professional interests will be an added advantage for the scientists and helps them learn most advanced aspects of their field.
  • It proves that these conferences provide a technique for valuable means of disseminating information and ideas that cannot be achieved by usual channels of communications.
  • To encourage an informal community atmosphere usually we select conference venues which are chosen partly for their scenic and often isolated nature.
  • In sinuations from many scientists and their reviews on our conferences reflected us to continue organizing annual conferences globally.
  • The conference proceedings are regularly publicized in respective journals and details of such proceedings are displayed in the individual conference website.

Organizing Committee

Teodor Rusu
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Teodor Rusu

Queensland University of Technology, Romania
Abdulrasoul  M. Alomran
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Abdulrasoul M. Alomran

King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
Daniele De Wrachien
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Daniele De Wrachien

Sciences University of Milan Milan, Italy
Dr. Manuel Tornel
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Dr. Manuel Tornel

IMIDA & ITUM, Spain
Sagadevan Mundree
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Sagadevan Mundree

Queensland University of Technology,Australia
Roberto Gaxiola
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Roberto Gaxiola

Arizona State University, USA

Speakers

Ruth Welti
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Ruth Welti

Kansas State University, USA
Abdeen Mustafa Omer
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Abdeen Mustafa Omer

Energy Research Institute, United Kingdom
Juan Li
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Juan Li

International Centre for Bamboo and Rattan, Beijing, P.R.China
Arafat A. Alkhasha
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Arafat A. Alkhasha

King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
Nirmali Gogoi
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Nirmali Gogoi

Tezpur University Napaam, India

Target Audience


Plant Science & Agricultural Students 
Scientists Plant Science Faculty 
Agricultural Universities 
Plant and Agriculture Associations and Societies 
Business Entrepreneurs 
Seed Science and Technology 
Soil science and soil-plant nutrition 
Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Sciences 
Manufacturing Agricultural Devices Companies 
R&D Laboratories 
Scientists & Researchers 
Food Science and Safety Department 
Forestry and Landscaping Scientists 
Agriculture & Food Security 
Young Researchers 
Training Institutes & Industry Professionals

Don’t Miss This Event

Great Event Schedule

Time Session
09:00-09:15 Registrations
09:15-09:30 Keynote Forum Opening Ceremony
09:30-11:30 Session Keynote Forum
11:30-11:45 Networking and Refreshment Break
11:45-13:00 Sessions
13:00-13:40 Lunch Break
13:40-15:30 Sessions
15:30-15:45 Networking and Refreshment Break
15:45-17:45 Sessions
17:45-18:00 Panel Discussion
Time Session
09:15-10:45 Keynote Forum
10:45-11:15 Networking and Refreshment Break
11:15-13:00 Sessions
13:00-13:45 Lunch Break
13:45-15:30 Sessions
15:30-15:45 Networking and Refreshment Break
15:45-17:00 Poster Presentations and Panel discussion
Time Session
Time Session

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